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Fuels quick response pays off big

Fuel Specialists Senior Amn Jim Hubbard, left, and Staff Sgt Zack Shields inspect a fuel nozzle on a fuel truck for contaminents that might pass onto an aircraft fuel tanks. The Fuels Section of the 124th Logistics Readiness Squadron, Idaho Air National Guard, recently discovered debrit in a shipment of jet fuel before it had done damage to aircraft saving equipment and money. (Air Force photo by Staff Sgt Heather Walsh)(Released)

Fuel Specialists Senior Amn Jim Hubbard, left, and Staff Sgt Zack Shields inspect a fuel nozzle on a fuel truck for contaminents that might pass onto an aircraft fuel tanks. The Fuels Section of the 124th Logistics Readiness Squadron, Idaho Air National Guard, recently discovered debrit in a shipment of jet fuel before it had done damage to aircraft saving equipment and money. (Air Force photo by Staff Sgt Heather Walsh)(Released)

GOWEN FIELD, Boise, Idaho -- During normal morning checks Sept. 2, Staff Sgt. Jim Hubbard of the Fuels Squadron discovered metal fragments in two fuel trucks here which prompted a quick response that protected wing assets and lives.

Upon further investigation Hubbard and Staff Sgt. Zach Shields a fellow Fuels Specialist discovered additional contamination and called in Master Sgt. Terry Prince of Liquid Fuels Maintenance. Within minutes their assessment of the contamination situation called for an immediate stop of all flying and fuel related operations.

"Response all the way up the chain was awesome, they didn't hesitate to ground the aircraft. There is no reason to risk lives," said Senior Master Sgt. Cal Garlock, Fuels Superintendent.

The contamination did damage several fuel trucks and cause delays in flight time but the prompt actions prevented additional asset damage, possible aircraft engine failure and even loss of life, said Garlock.

This source of contamination has been narrowed to a specific section of pipe here on base and is still under investigation to determine the specific cause.

Every morning we pull samples from the fuel trucks. These visual samples give us an indication of the condition of the fuel. At certain times we do lab samples that tell us the exact condition of the fuel, said Garlock